#139 - Blue Ruin
"Suspense" is a genre that doesn’t get mentioned much these days. We’ve discussed in the past how the genre of "thriller" is just horror movies that we don’t want to call horror movies so they sound classier, but I do have to say that Blue Ruin is the real deal, a genuine suspense film. And I’m going to talk about a suspense film without using the word “Hitchcockian.”
Blue Ruin is the story of a young homeless man who is pulled back into reality after he learns the person who murdered his parents is being released from prison. Without hesitation, Dwight immediately sets out to kill him, and when I say “immediately,” I mean he’s waiting at the prison for him to be released.
A typical revenge film would see his quest stretched out over the full 90+ minutes, but Blue Ruin takes us on a genuinely shocking detour and really never lets up after that. And it never feels inauthentic, the world it creates is completely logical, if horrifying. We all have that piece of us that says “if someone hurt my family, I’d kill them,” but Blue Ruin makes you question your gut instincts about vigilante justice. Does it ever fill the void left in our souls after we experience trauma?
Many of the folks behind Blue Ruin were also involved in 2007’s silly-but-fun Murder Party, but you’d never know it unless you checked IMDB. The differences between these films are night-and-day, one a campy horror comedy, this a deeply serious, tragic and downright sad thriller that’ll stick with you.
It’s on VOD now… watch it.
Viewed on May 3, 2014.

#139 - Blue Ruin

"Suspense" is a genre that doesn’t get mentioned much these days. We’ve discussed in the past how the genre of "thriller" is just horror movies that we don’t want to call horror movies so they sound classier, but I do have to say that Blue Ruin is the real deal, a genuine suspense film. And I’m going to talk about a suspense film without using the word “Hitchcockian.”

Blue Ruin is the story of a young homeless man who is pulled back into reality after he learns the person who murdered his parents is being released from prison. Without hesitation, Dwight immediately sets out to kill him, and when I say “immediately,” I mean he’s waiting at the prison for him to be released.

A typical revenge film would see his quest stretched out over the full 90+ minutes, but Blue Ruin takes us on a genuinely shocking detour and really never lets up after that. And it never feels inauthentic, the world it creates is completely logical, if horrifying. We all have that piece of us that says “if someone hurt my family, I’d kill them,” but Blue Ruin makes you question your gut instincts about vigilante justice. Does it ever fill the void left in our souls after we experience trauma?

Many of the folks behind Blue Ruin were also involved in 2007’s silly-but-fun Murder Party, but you’d never know it unless you checked IMDB. The differences between these films are night-and-day, one a campy horror comedy, this a deeply serious, tragic and downright sad thriller that’ll stick with you.

It’s on VOD now… watch it.

Viewed on May 3, 2014.

  1. myyearinmovies posted this